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Elif Shafak

Biography

Elif Shafak

Elif Shafak is an award-winning novelist and the most widely read female writer in Turkey. She is also a women's rights activist and an inspirational public intellectual and speaker.

She writes in both Turkish and English, and has published 16 books, 10 of which are novels, including the bestselling THE BASTARD OF ISTANBUL, THE FORTY RULES OF LOVE and her most recent, THREE DAUGHTERS OF EVE. Her books have been published in 49 languages.

Shafak is a TED Global speaker, a member of Weforum Global Agenda Council on Creative Economy in Davos, and a founding member of ECFR (European Council on Foreign Relations). She has been awarded the title of Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres in 2010 by the French government.

She has been featured in and contributes to major newspapers and periodicals around the world, including the Financial Times, the Guardian, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Der Spiegel and La Repubblica.  

Shafak holds a degree in International Relations, a masters’ degree in Gender and Women’s Studies, and a PhD in Political Science and Political Philosophy. She has taught at various universities in Turkey, the UK and the USA, including the University of Michigan and University of Arizona. She was the 2018 Weidenfeld Visiting Professor in Comparative European Literature at Oxford.

In addition to her work for freedom of speech and literacy, Shafak is known as a women’s rights, minority rights and LGBT rights advocate.

Shafak has been longlisted for the Orange Prize, MAN Asian Prize, the Baileys Prize and the IMPAC Dublin Award, and shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and RSL Ondaatje Prize.

Elif Shafak

Books by Elif Shafak

by Elif Shafak - Fiction

The Bastard of Istanbul is the story of two families, one Turkish and one Armenian American, and their struggle to forge their unique identities against the backdrop of Turkey's violent history. This exuberant, dramatic novel is about memory and forgetting, about the tension between the need to examine the past and the desire to erase it.