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Rachel Kushner's New Novel is about a Life Gone Off the Rails in Contemporary America

Far more than a prison novel, THE MARS ROOM by the two-time National Book Award finalist is a thoughtful exploration of our very humanity.

Allison Pataki's Deeply Moving Memoir is the Story of Her Husband's Stroke and Recovery

As a way to make sense of the pain and chaos of their new reality, Allison started writing letters to Dave, which became the foundation for this book.

Jewell's Psychological Thriller is Also a Portrait of the Aftermath of Trauma

According to the reviewer, "Jewell demonstrates once again that she has what it takes to genuinely shock, surprise and move her readers."

YOU THINK IT, I'LL SAY IT is Curtis Sittenfeld's First Collection of Short Fiction

These 10 stories upend assumptions about class, relationships and gender roles in a nation that feels both adrift and viscerally divided.

ASH PRINCESS by Laura Sebastian is the Story of a Princess Turned Prisoner

With blood on her hands and all hope of reclaiming her throne lost, she realizes that surviving is no longer enough, and she must fight back.

Caleb Roehrig’s WHITE RABBIT is a Twisted Tale of Mystery and Murder

With no one to trust but the boy he wants to hate yet can’t stop loving, Rufus has one night to prove his sister’s innocence…or die trying.

From the Blog

January 16, 2018
One of the most popular resolutions people make at the start of every new year is to eat healthier and maybe hit the gym once or twice. But what do you do when your new favorite book ends on a...
July 11, 2017
One of our most highly-anticipated releases this summer is BECAUSE YOU LOVE TO HATE ME: 13 Tales of Villainy, a collection of short stories edited by Ameriie. In these 13 short stories written by 13...
May 15, 2017
The YA community has been buzzing about “13 Reasons Why,” the Netflix show based on the YA book of the same name by Jay Asher. Since the show's release, it has been given a trigger...
October 24, 2016
Who John Green: New York Times bestselling author of LOOKING FOR ALASKA, AN ABUNDANCE OF KATHERINES, PAPER TOWNS, WILL GRAYSON, WILL GRAYSON and, of course, THE FAULT IN OUR STARS
October 17, 2016
The Alternative Press Expo in San Jose, California, took place on a beautiful day where the golden light was like something out of a Maxfield Parrish painting. On October 8 and 9, 2016, The San Jose...

Coffee Break

For more than 10 years, a mysterious and violent predator committed 50 sexual assaults in Northern California before moving south, where he perpetrated 10 sadistic murders. Then he disappeared, eluding capture by multiple police forces and some of the best detectives in the area. Three decades later, Michelle McNamara, a true crime journalist who created the popular website TrueCrimeDiary.com, was determined to find the violent psychopath she called "the Golden State Killer." Michelle pored over police reports, interviewed victims, and embedded herself in the online communities that were as obsessed with the case as she was.

I'LL BE GONE IN THE DARK: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer
By Michelle McNamara

Reviews

Struggling to juggle the demands of motherhood with her own aspirations, Rebecca Stone reaches out to the only person at the hospital who offers her any real help --- Priscilla Johnson --- and begs her to come home with them as her son’s nanny. Priscilla’s presence quickly does as much to shake up Rebecca’s perception of the world as it does to stabilize her life. Rebecca is white, and Priscilla is black, and through their relationship, Rebecca finds herself confronting, for the first time, the blind spots of her own privilege. When Priscilla dies unexpectedly in childbirth, Rebecca steps forward to adopt the baby. But she is unprepared for what it means to be a white mother with a black son.

Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture edited by Roxane Gay - Gender Studies/Essays

Cultural critic and bestselling author Roxane Gay collects original and previously published pieces that address what it means to live in a world where women have to measure the harassment, violence and aggression they face, and where they are “routinely second-guessed, blown off, discredited, denigrated, besmirched, belittled, patronized, mocked, shamed, gaslit, insulted, bullied” for speaking out. Contributions include essays from established and up-and-coming writers, performers and critics, including actors Ally Sheedy and Gabrielle Union and writers Amy Jo Burns, Lyz Lenz and Claire Schwartz.

Stone Barrington is enjoying a round of golf in Key West when the game is violently interrupted --- and it seems as if the target of the disturbance may have been one of his playing companions, the brilliant businesswoman behind a software startup on the cutting edge of technology. Soon, it becomes clear that this incident is only the first thrust in a deadly scheme to push the beautiful young woman out of the way and put her company's valuable secrets up for grabs. Stone embarks on a quest to protect his lovely new companion while searching for the mastermind behind the plot against her. But he may find that her enemy is far more resourceful --- and dangerous --- than he could have anticipated.

Tin Man by Sarah Winman - Fiction

Ellis and Michael are 12-year-old boys when they first become friends, and for a long time it is just the two of them --- cycling the streets of Oxford, teaching themselves how to swim, discovering poetry, and dodging the fists of overbearing fathers. And then one day this closest of friendships grows into something more. But then we fast-forward a decade or so, to find that Ellis is married to Annie, and Michael is nowhere in sight. Which leads to the question: What happened in the years between?

The publication of GO SET A WATCHMAN in 2015 forever changed how we think about Atticus Finch. Once seen as a paragon of decency, he was reduced to a small-town racist. In ATTICUS FINCH, historian Joseph Crespino draws on exclusive sources to reveal how Harper Lee's father provided the central inspiration for each of her books. A lawyer and newspaperman, A. C. Lee was a principled opponent of mob rule, yet he was also a racial paternalist. Harper Lee created the Atticus of WATCHMAN out of the ambivalence she felt toward white southerners like him. But when a militant segregationist movement arose that mocked his values, she revised the character in TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD to defend her father and to remind the South of its best traditions.

Pretend I'm Dead by Jen Beagin - Fiction/Humor

Mona is almost 24, emotionally adrift and cleaning houses to get by. Handing out clean needles to drug addicts, she falls for a recipient she calls Mr. Disgusting, who proceeds to break her heart in unimaginable ways. In search of healing, Mona decamps to Taos, New Mexico, where she finds a community of seekers and cast-offs, all of whom have one or two things to teach her --- the pajama-wearing, blissed-out New Agers, the slightly creepy client with peculiar tastes in controlled substances, the psychic who might really be psychic. But always lurking just beneath the surface are her memories of growing up in a chaotic, destructive family from which she’s trying to disentangle herself, and the larger legacy of the past she left behind.

Everything That Follows by Meg Little Reilly - Psychological Suspense

Around midnight, three friends take their partying from bar to boat on a misty fall evening. Just as the weather deteriorates, one of them suddenly and confusingly goes overboard. Is it an accident? The result of an unwanted advance? His body disappears quickly, silently, into the dark water. The circumstances are murky, but what is clear is that the other two need to notify the authorities. Minutes become hours become days as they hesitate, caught up in their guilt and hope that their friend has somehow made it safely to shore. As valuable time passes, they find themselves deep in a moral morass with huge implications as they struggle to move forward and live with their dark secret.

Miss Subways by David Duchovny - Fantasy/Humor

Emer is just a woman living in New York City who takes the subway, buys ice cream from the bodega on the corner, has writerly aspirations, and lives with her boyfriend, Con. But is this life she lives the only path she’s on? Taking inspiration from the myth of Emer and Cuchulain, and featuring an all-star cast of mythical figures from all over the world, David Duchovny’s MISS SUBWAYS is one woman’s trippy, mystical journey down parallel tracks of time and love. On the way, Emer will battle natural and supernatural forces to find her true voice, power and destiny.

Leslie Jamison deftly excavates the stories we tell about addiction --- both her own and others' --- and examines what we want these stories to do and what happens when they fail us. All the while, she offers a fascinating look at the larger history of the recovery movement, and at the complicated bearing that race and class have on our understanding of who is criminal and who is ill. At the heart of the book is Jamison's ongoing conversation with literary and artistic geniuses whose lives and works were shaped by alcoholism and substance dependence --- including Raymond Carver, Denis Johnson and David Foster Wallace --- as well as brilliant lesser-known figures, lost to obscurity but newly illuminated here.

Startling new evidence in a cold case that has haunted Pete Fernandez drags the exiled PI back to his hometown of Miami. But as Pete and his partner, Kathy Bentley, delve deeper into the unsolved murder, they become entangled in Miami’s obsession with a charismatic and dangerous cult leader and his even more menacing followers. At the same time, the detectives find themselves at odds with a Florida politician’s fixation on wealth, fame and power. It all converges in the heart of the Magic City, and Pete is left scrambling to pick up the pieces --- or die trying.

Motherhood by Sheila Heti - Fiction

In her late 30s, when her friends are asking when they will become mothers, the narrator of MOTHERHOOD considers if she will do so at all. In a narrative spanning several years, casting among the influence of her peers, partner and her duties to her forbearers, she struggles to make a wise and moral choice. After seeking guidance from philosophy, her body, mysticism and chance, she discovers her answer much closer to home.